Siddhartha


Pic of the day: Gandara Buddha

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Today is nothing but the above pic of the Buddha, from a sculpture in the Tokyo National Museum, and a few quotes from the book Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.  Long day, short night, many things to do between now and bedtime, 30 minutes from now.  Actual content will come tomorrow, methinks.

Enjoy.

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Siddhartha … had begun to suspect that his worthy father and his other teachers, the wise Brahmins, had already passed on to him the bulk and best of their wisdom, that they had already poured the sum total of their knowledge into his waiting vessel; and the vessel was not full, his intellect was not satisfied.

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Wisdom is not communicable. The wisdom which a wise man tries to communicate always sounds foolish… Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.

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I had to strive for property and experience nausea and the depths of despair in order to learn not to resist them, in order to learn to love the world, and no longer compare it with some kind of desired imaginary world, some imaginary vision of perfection, but to leave it as it is, to love it and be glad to belong to it. These, Govinda, are some of the thoughts in my mind.

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There is, so I believe, in the essence of everything, something that we cannot call learning. There is, my friend, only a knowledge — that is everywhere, that is Atman, that is in me and you and in every creature, and I am beginning to believe that this knowledge has no worse enemy than the man of knowledge, than learning.

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They knew a tremendous number of things — But was it worthwhile knowing all these things if they did not know the one important thing, the only important thing?

Hermann Hesse

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That’s it from here, America

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